Global Bitcoin Gold Nodes Distribution

We've added a (simple) Bitcoin Cash node status checker over at Coin Dance. Let us know what you think!

submitted by Coin-Dance to btc [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Filecoin | Development Status and Mining Progress

Author: Gamals Ahmed, CoinEx Business Ambassador
https://preview.redd.it/5bqakdqgl3g51.jpg?width=865&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b709794863977eb6554e3919b9e00ca750e3e704
A decentralized storage network that transforms cloud storage into an account market. Miners obtain the integrity of the original protocol by providing data storage and / or retrieval. On the contrary, customers pay miners to store or distribute data and retrieve it.
Filecoin announced, that there will be more delays before its main network is officially launched.
Filecoin developers postponed the release date of their main network to late July to late August 2020.
As mentioned in a recent announcement, the Filecoin team said that the initiative completed the first round of the internal protocol security audit. Platform developers claim that the results of the review showed that they need to make several changes to the protocol’s code base before performing the second stage of the software testing process.
Created by Protocol Labs, Filecoin was developed using File System (IPFS), which is a peer-to-peer data storage network. Filecoin will allow users to trade storage space in an open and decentralized market.
Filecoin developers implemented one of the largest cryptocurrency sales in 2017. They have privately obtained over $ 200 million from professional or accredited investors, including many institutional investors.
The main network was slated to launch last month, but in February 2020, the Philly Queen development team delayed the release of the main network between July 15 and July 17, 2020.
They claimed that the outbreak of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in China was the main cause of the delay. The developers now say that they need more time to solve the problems found during a recent codecase audit.
The Filecoin team noted the following:
“We have drafted a number of protocol changes to ensure that building our major network launch is safe and economically sound.” The project developers will add them to two different implementations of Filecoin (Lotus and go-filecoin) in the coming weeks.
Filecoin developers conducted a survey to allow platform community members to cast their votes on three different launch dates for Testnet Phase 2 and mainnet.
The team reported that the community gave their votes. Based on the vote results, the Filecoin team announced a “conservative” estimate that the second phase of the network test should begin by May 11, 2020. The main Filecoin network may be launched sometime between July 20 and August 21, 2020.
The updates to the project can be found on the Filecoin Road Map.
Filecoin developers stated:
“This option will make us get the most important protocol changes first, and then implement the rest as protocol updates during testnet.” Filecoin is back down from the final test stage.
Another filecoin decentralized storage network provider launched its catalytic test network, the final stage of the storage network test that supports the blockchain.
In a blog post on her website, Filecoin said she will postpone the last test round until August. The company also announced a calibration period from July 20 to August 3 to allow miners to test their mining settings and get an idea of how competition conditions affected their rewards.
Filecoin had announced earlier last month that the catalytic testnet test would precede its flagship launch. The delay in the final test also means that the company has returned the main launch window between August 31 and September 21.
Despite the lack of clear incentives for miners and multiple delays, Filecoin has succeeded in attracting huge interest, especially in China. Investors remained highly speculating on the network’s mining hardware and its premium price.
Mining in Filecoin
In most blockchain protocols, “miners” are network participants who do the work necessary to promote and maintain the blockchain. To provide these services, miners are compensated in the original cryptocurrency.
Mining in Filecoin works completely differently — instead of contributing to computational power, miners contribute storage capacity to use for dealing with customers looking to store data.
Filecoin will contain several types of miners:
Storage miners responsible for storing files and data on the network. Miners retrieval, responsible for providing quick tubes for file recovery. Miners repair to be carried out.
Storage miners are the heart of the network. They earn Filecoin by storing data for clients, and computerizing cipher directories to check storage over time. The probability of earning the reward reward and transaction fees is proportional to the amount of storage that the Miner contributes to the Filecoin network, not the hash power.
Retriever miners are the veins of the network. They earn Filecoin by winning bids and mining fees for a specific file, which is determined by the market value of the said file size. Miners bandwidth and recovery / initial transaction response time will determine its ability to close recovery deals on the network.
The maximum bandwidth of the recovery miners will determine the total amount of deals that it can enter into.
In the current implementation, the focus is mostly on storage miners, who sell storage capacity for FIL.

Hardware recommendations

The current system specifications recommended for running the miner are:
Compared to the hardware requirements for running a validity checker, these standards are much higher — although they definitely deserve it. Since these will not increase in the presumed future, the money spent on Filecoin mining hardware will provide users with many years of reliable service, and they pay themselves many times. Think of investing as a small business for cloud storage. To launch a model on the current data hosting model, it will cost millions of dollars in infrastructure and logistics to get started. With Filecoin, you can do the same for a few thousand dollars.
Proceed to mining
Deals are the primary function of the Filecoin network, and it represents an agreement between a client and miners for a “storage” contract.
Once the customer decides to have a miner to store based on the available capacity, duration and price required, he secures sufficient funds in a linked portfolio to cover the total cost of the deal. The deal is then published once the mine accepts the storage agreement. By default, all Filecoin miners are set to automatically accept any deal that meets their criteria, although this can be disabled for miners who prefer to organize their deals manually.
After the deal is published, the customer prepares the data for storage and then transfers it to the miner. Upon receiving all the data, the miner fills in the data in a sector, closes it, and begins to provide proofs to the chain. Once the first confirmation is obtained, the customer can make sure the data is stored correctly, and the deal has officially started.
Throughout the deal, the miner provides continuous proofs to the chain. Clients gradually pay with money they previously closed. If there is missing or late evidence, the miner is punished. More information about this can be found in the Runtime, Cut and Penalties section of this page.
At Filecoin, miners earn two different types of rewards for their efforts: storage fees and reward prevention.
Storage fees are the fees that customers pay regularly after reaching a deal, in exchange for storing data. This fee is automatically deposited into the withdrawal portfolio associated with miners while they continue to perform their duties over time, and is locked for a short period upon receipt.
Block rewards are large sums given to miners calculated on a new block. Unlike storage fees, these rewards do not come from a linked customer; Instead, the new FIL “prints” the network as an inflationary and incentive measure for miners to develop the chain. All active miners on the network have a chance to get a block bonus, their chance to be directly proportional to the amount of storage space that is currently being contributed to the network.
Duration of operation, cutting and penalties
“Slashing” is a feature found in most blockchain protocols, and is used to punish miners who fail to provide reliable uptime or act maliciously against the network.
In Filecoin, miners are susceptible to two different types of cut: storage error cut, unanimously reduce error.
Storage Error Reduction is a term used to include a wider range of penalties, including error fees, sector penalties, and termination fees. Miners must pay these penalties if they fail to provide reliability of the sector or decide to leave the network voluntarily.
An error fee is a penalty that a miner incurs for each non-working day. Sector punishment: A penalty incurred by a miner of a disrupted sector for which no error was reported before the WindowPoSt inspection.
The sector will pay an error fee after the penalty of the sector once the error is discovered.
Termination Fee: A penalty that a miner incurs when a sector is voluntary or involuntarily terminated and removed from the network.
Cutting consensus error is the penalty that a miner incurs for committing consensus errors. This punishment applies to miners who have acted maliciously against the network consensus function.
Filecoin miners
Eight of the top 10 Felticoin miners are Chinese investors or companies, according to the blockchain explorer, while more companies are selling cloud mining contracts and distributed file sharing system hardware. CoinDesk’s Wolfe Chao wrote: “China’s craze for Filecoin may have been largely related to the long-standing popularity of crypto mining in the country overall, which is home to about 65% of the computing power on Bitcoin at discretion.”
With Filecoin approaching the launch of the mainnet blocknet — after several delays since the $ 200 million increase in 2017 — Chinese investors are once again speculating strongly about network mining devices and their premium prices.
Since Protocol Labs, the company behind Filecoin, released its “Test Incentives” program on June 9 that was scheduled to start in a week’s time, more than a dozen Chinese companies have started selling cloud mining contracts and hardware — despite important details such as economics Mining incentives on the main network are still endless.
Sales volumes to date for each of these companies can range from half a million to tens of millions of dollars, according to self-reported data on these platforms that CoinDesk has watched and interviews with several mining hardware manufacturers.
Filecoin’s goal is to build a distributed storage network with token rewards to spur storage hosting as a way to drive wider adoption. Protocol Labs launched a test network in December 2019. But the tokens mined in the testing environment so far are not representative of the true silicon coin that can be traded when the main network is turned on. Moreover, the mining incentive economics on testnet do not represent how final block rewards will be available on the main network.
However, data from Blockecoin’s blocknetin testnet explorers show that eight out of 10 miners with the most effective mining force on testnet are currently Chinese miners.
These eight miners have about 15 petabytes (PB) of effective storage mining power, accounting for more than 85% of the total test of 17.9 petable. For the context, 1 petabyte of hard disk storage = 1000 terabytes (terabytes) = 1 million gigabytes (GB).
Filecoin craze in China may be closely related to the long-standing popularity of crypt mining in the country overall, which is home to about 65% of the computing power on Bitcoin by estimation. In addition, there has been a lot of hype in China about foreign exchange mining since 2018, as companies promote all types of devices when the network is still in development.
“Encryption mining has always been popular in China,” said Andy Tien, co-founder of 1475, one of several mining hardware manufacturers in Philquin supported by prominent Chinese video indicators such as Fenbushi and Hashkey Capital.
“Even though the Velikoyen mining process is more technologically sophisticated, the idea of mining using hard drives instead of specialized machines like Bitcoin ASIC may be a lot easier for retailers to understand,” he said.
Meanwhile, according to Feixiaohao, a Chinese service comparable to CoinMarketCap, nearly 50 Chinese crypto exchanges are often somewhat unknown with some of the more well-known exchanges including Gate.io and Biki — have listed trading pairs for Filecoin currency contracts for USDT.
In bitcoin mining, at the current difficulty level, one segment per second (TH / s) fragmentation rate is expected to generate around 0.000008 BTC within 24 hours. The higher the number of TH / s, the greater the number of bitcoins it should be able to produce proportionately. But in Filecoin, the efficient mining force of miners depends on the amount of data stamped on the hard drive, not the total size of the hard drive.
To close data in the hard drive, the Filecoin miner still needs processing power, i.e. CPU or GPU as well as RAM. More powerful processors with improved software can confine data to the hard drive more quickly, so miners can combine more efficient mining energy faster on a given day.
As of this stage, there appears to be no transparent way at the network level for retail investors to see how much of the purchased hard disk drive was purchased which actually represents an effective mining force.
The U.S.-based Labs Protocol was behind Filecoin’s initial coin offer for 2017, which raised an astonishing $ 200 million.
This was in addition to a $ 50 million increase in private investment supported by notable venture capital projects including Sequoia, Anderson Horowitz and Union Square Ventures. CoinDk’s parent company, CoinDk, has also invested in Protocol Labs.
After rounds of delay, Protocol Protocols said in September 2019 that a testnet launch would be available around December 2019 and the main network would be rolled out in the first quarter of 2020.
The test started as promised, but the main network has been delayed again and is now expected to launch in August 2020. What is Filecoin mining process?
Filecoin mainly consists of three parts: the storage market (the chain), the blockecin Filecoin, and the search market (under the chain). Storage and research market in series and series respectively for security and efficiency. For users, the storage frequency is relatively low, and the security requirements are relatively high, so the storage process is placed on the chain. The retrieval frequency is much higher than the storage frequency when there is a certain amount of data. Given the performance problem in processing data on the chain, the retrieval process under the chain is performed. In order to solve the security issue of payment in the retrieval process, Filecoin adopts the micro-payment strategy. In simple terms, the process is to split the document into several copies, and every time the user gets a portion of the data, the corresponding fee is paid. Types of mines corresponding to Filecoin’s two major markets are miners and warehousers, among whom miners are primarily responsible for storing data and block packages, while miners are primarily responsible for data query. After the stable operation of the major Filecoin network in the future, the mining operator will be introduced, who is the main responsible for data maintenance.
In the initial release of Filecoin, the request matching mechanism was not implemented in the storage market and retrieval market, but the takeover mechanism was adopted. The three main parts of Filecoin correspond to three processes, namely the stored procedure, retrieval process, packaging and reward process. The following figure shows the simplified process and the income of the miners:
The Filecoin mining process is much more complicated, and the important factor in determining the previous mining profit is efficient storage. Effective storage is a key feature that distinguishes Filecoin from other decentralized storage projects. In Filecoin’s EC consensus, effective storage is similar to interest in PoS, which determines the likelihood that a miner will get the right to fill, that is, the proportion of miners effectively stored in the entire network is proportional to final mining revenue.
It is also possible to obtain higher effective storage under the same hardware conditions by improving the mining algorithm. However, the current increase in the number of benefits that can be achieved by improving the algorithm is still unknown.
It seeks to promote mining using Filecoin Discover
Filecoin announced Filecoin Discover — a step to encourage miners to join the Filecoin network. According to the company, Filecoin Discover is “an ever-growing catalog of numerous petabytes of public data covering literature, science, art, and history.” Miners interested in sharing can choose which data sets they want to store, and receive that data on a drive at a cost. In exchange for storing this verified data, miners will earn additional Filecoin above the regular block rewards for storing data. Includes the current catalog of open source data sets; ENCODE, 1000 Genomes, Project Gutenberg, Berkley Self-driving data, more projects, and datasets are added every day.
Ian Darrow, Head of Operations at Filecoin, commented on the announcement:
“Over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day. This data includes 294 billion emails, 500 million tweets and 64 billion messages on social media. But it is also climatology reports, disease tracking maps, connected vehicle coordinates and much more. It is extremely important that we maintain data that will serve as the backbone for future research and discovery”.
Miners who choose to participate in Filecoin Discover may receive hard drives pre-loaded with verified data, as well as setup and maintenance instructions, depending on the company. The Filecoin team will also host the Slack (fil-Discover-support) channel where miners can learn more.
Filecoin got its fair share of obstacles along the way. Last month Filecoin announced a further delay before its main network was officially launched — after years of raising funds.
In late July QEBR (OTC: QEBR) announced that it had ceded ownership of two subsidiaries in order to focus all of the company’s resources on building blockchain-based mining operations.
The QEBR technology team previously announced that it has proven its system as a Filecoin node valid with CPU, GPU, bandwidth and storage compatibility that meets all IPFS guidelines. The QEBR test system is connected to the main Filecoin blockchain and the already mined filecoin coin has already been tested.
“The disclosure of Sheen Boom and Jihye will allow our team to focus only on the upcoming global launch of Filecoin. QEBR branch, Shenzhen DZD Digital Technology Ltd. (“ DZD “), has a strong background in blockchain development, extraction Data, data acquisition, data processing, data technology research. We strongly believe Filecoin has the potential to be a leading blockchain-based cryptocurrency and will make every effort to make QEBR an important player when Mainecoin mainnet will be launched soon”.
IPFS and Filecoin
Filecoin and IPFS are complementary protocols for storing and sharing data in a decentralized network. While users are not required to use Filecoin and IPFS together, the two combined are working to resolve major failures in the current web infrastructure.
IPFS
It is an open source protocol that allows users to store and transmit verifiable data with each other. IPFS users insist on data on the network by installing it on their own device, to a third-party cloud service (known as Pinning Services), or through community-oriented systems where a group of individual IPFS users share resources to ensure the content stays live.
The lack of an integrated catalytic mechanism is the challenge Filecoin hopes to solve by allowing users to catalyze long-term distributed storage at competitive prices through the storage contract market, while maintaining the efficiency and flexibility that the IPFS network provides.
Using IPFS
In IPFS, the data is hosted by the required data installation nodes. For data to persist while the user node is offline, users must either rely on their other peers to install their data voluntarily or use a central install service to store data.
Peer-to-peer reliance caching data may be a good thing as one or multiple organizations share common files on an internal network, or where strong social contracts can be used to ensure continued hosting and preservation of content in the long run. Most users in an IPFS network use an installation service.
Using Filecoin
The last option is to install your data in a decentralized storage market, such as Filecoin. In Filecoin’s structure, customers make regular small payments to store data when a certain availability, while miners earn those payments by constantly checking the integrity of this data, storing it, and ensuring its quick recovery. This allows users to motivate Filecoin miners to ensure that their content will be live when it is needed, a distinct advantage of relying only on other network users as required using IPFS alone.
Filecoin, powered by IPFS
It is important to know that Filecoin is built on top of IPFS. Filecoin aims to be a very integrated and seamless storage market that takes advantage of the basic functions provided by IPFS, they are connected to each other, but can be implemented completely independently of each other. Users do not need to interact with Filecoin in order to use IPFS.
Some advantages of sharing Filecoin with IPFS:
Of all the decentralized storage projects, Filecoin is undoubtedly the most interested, and IPFS has been running stably for two years, fully demonstrating the strength of its core protocol.
Filecoin’s ability to obtain market share from traditional central storage depends on end-user experience and storage price. Currently, most Filecoin nodes are posted in the IDC room. Actual deployment and operation costs are not reduced compared to traditional central cloud storage, and the storage process is more complicated.
PoRep and PoSt, which has a large number of proofs of unknown operation, are required to cause the actual storage cost to be so, in the early days of the release of Filecoin. The actual cost of storing data may be higher than the cost of central cloud storage, but the initial storage node may reduce the storage price in order to obtain block rewards, which may result in the actual storage price lower than traditional central cloud storage.
In the long term, Filecoin still needs to take full advantage of its P2P storage, convert storage devices from specialization to civil use, and improve its algorithms to reduce storage costs without affecting user experience. The storage problem is an important problem to be solved in the blockchain field, so a large number of storage projects were presented at the 19th Web3 Summit. IPFS is an important part of Web3 visibility. Its development will affect the development of Web3 to some extent. Likewise, Web3 development somewhat determines the future of IPFS. Filecoin is an IPFS-based storage class project initiated by IPFS. There is no doubt that he is highly expected.
Resources :
  1. https://www.coindesk.com/filecoin-pushes-back-final-testing-phase-announces-calibration-period-for-miners
  2. https://docs.filecoin.io/mine/#types-of-miners https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/inside-the-craze-for-filecoin-crypto-mining-in-china-2020-07-12؟amp
  3. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/qebr-streamlines-holdings-to-concentrate-on-filecoin-development-and-mining-301098731.html
  4. https://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2020/05/161200-filecoin-seeks-to-boost-mining-with-filecoin-discove
  5. https://zephyrnet.com/filecoin-seeks-to-boost-mining-with-filecoin-discove
  6. https://docs.filecoin.io/introduction/ipfs-and-filecoin/#filecoin-powered-by-ipfs
submitted by CoinEx_Institution to filecoin [link] [comments]

Strange problem

(Just status updates, not mixing <<< later headline edit)
Have run Wasabi for about week, still no coins marked as 'queued' (no status column before Amount column at all), thought at same time they look like queued - right click menu has no option for queueing, there is an option 'Dequeue from CoinJoin' but this is not active. No errors in log, tor is running, backend connected, peers available, amont large enough.???

Sample from log (and that loops... and loops, with new rounds added and then getting removed) -
INFO WalletManager (30) .ctor finished.INFO Global (79) .ctor finished.
INFO Program (43) Wasabi GUI started .
INFO TransactionStore (29) MempoolStore.InitializeAsync finished.
INFO TorProcessManager (251) Starting Tor monitor...
INFO Global (168) TorProcessManager is initialized.
INFO TransactionStore (29) ConfirmedStore.InitializeAsync finished.
INFO AllTransactionStore (28) InitializeAsync finished.
INFO TorProcessManager (75) Tor is already running.
INFO Global (392) Loaded AddressManager from `/home/use.walletwasabi/client/AddressManageAddressManagerMain.dat`.
INFO IndexStore (45) InitializeAsync finished.
INFO BitcoinStore (39) InitializeAsync finished.
INFO HostedServices (51) Started Software Update Checker.
INFO Global (290) Start connecting to nodes...
INFO Global (314) Start synchronizing filters...
INFO WalletManager (192) Starting Wallet...
INFO CoinJoinClient (133) CoinJoinClient is successfully initialized.
INFO Wallet (179) StartAsync finished.
INFO WalletManager (194) Wallet started.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (261) Downloaded filters for blocks.
INFO ClientState (470) Round (22767) added.
INFO ClientState (470) Round (22768) added.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) 0 transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO ClientState (452) Round (22767) removed. Reason: It's not running anymore.
INFO ClientState (470) Round (22769) added.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (257) Downloaded filter.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (261) Downloaded filters for blocks.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (257) Downloaded filter.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (257) Downloaded filter.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO WasabiSynchronizer (257) Downloaded filter.
INFO MempoolService (119) Start cleaning out mempool...
INFO MempoolService (129) transactions were cleaned from mempool.
INFO ClientState (452) Round (22768) removed. Reason: It's not running anymore.
INFO ClientState (470) Round (22770) added.
INFO ClientState (452) Round (22769) removed. Reason: It's not running anymore.
INFO ClientState (470) Round (22771) added.
submitted by saj3bis to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Having Trouble with Regtest Running Inside a Docker Container

Hello everyone. First of all, thanks in advance for any help.
I'm running a BTCPay server using BTCPay server docker. If I understand it correctly, it exposes the regtest Bitcoin core through a Tor network.
I followed the instructions on the [BTCPay Server docs to Connect Wasabi to BTCPay Server Full Node. Unfortunately, after following these instructions, the bottom-left corner of Wasabi Wallet still reads "Connecting...".
My logs.txt reveals:
2020-03-29 20:34:51 INFO Program (44) Wasabi GUI started (14879af3-85dd-42aa-9d41-674d87a5dd77). 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO Global (164) Config is successfully initialized. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO TransactionStore (28) ConfirmedStore.InitializeAsync finished in 4 milliseconds. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO TransactionStore (28) MempoolStore.InitializeAsync finished in 12 milliseconds. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO Global (401) Fake AddressManager is initialized on the RegTest. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO AllTransactionStore (27) InitializeAsync finished in 16 milliseconds. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO IndexStore (43) InitializeAsync finished in 40 milliseconds. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO BitcoinStore (39) InitializeAsync finished in 43 milliseconds. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO TorProcessManager (249) Starting Tor monitor... 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO Global (230) TorProcessManager is initialized. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO HostedServices (49) Started Software Update Checker. 2020-03-29 20:34:52 INFO TorProcessManager (66) Tor is already running. 2020-03-29 20:34:53 ERROR Global (328) System.Net.Internals.SocketExceptionFactory+ExtendedSocketException (61): Connection refused [::ffff:127.0.0.1]:18444 at System.Runtime.ExceptionServices.ExceptionDispatchInfo.Throw(Exception source) at System.Net.Sockets.Socket.EndConnect(IAsyncResult asyncResult) at NBitcoin.Protocol.Connectors.SocketExtensions.<>c.b__0_0(IAsyncResult iar) --- End of stack trace from previous location where exception was thrown --- at NBitcoin.Extensions.WithCancellation[T](Task`1 task, CancellationToken cancellationToken) at NBitcoin.Protocol.Connectors.DefaultEndpointConnector.ConnectSocket(Socket socket, EndPoint endpoint, NodeConnectionParameters nodeConnectionParameters, CancellationToken cancellationToken) at NBitcoin.Protocol.Node.ConnectAsync(Network network, EndPoint endpoint, NetworkAddress peer, NodeConnectionParameters parameters) at WalletWasabi.Gui.Global.InitializeNoWalletAsync() 2020-03-29 20:34:53 INFO Global (349) Start connecting to nodes... 2020-03-29 20:34:53 INFO Global (373) Start synchronizing filters... 2020-03-29 20:34:53 INFO MainWindow.xaml (74) UiConfig is successfully initialized. 2020-03-29 20:34:57 ERROR PeriodicRunner (72) System.NotSupportedException: Invalid StatusLine: ?. - System.IndexOutOfRangeException: Index was outside the bounds of the array. at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.Parse(String statusLineString) --- End of inner exception stack trace --- at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.Parse(String statusLineString) at System.Net.Http.HttpResponseMessageExtensions.CreateNewAsync(Stream responseStream, HttpMethod requestMethod) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpMethod method, String relativeUri, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at TorHttpClientExtensions.SendAndRetryAsync(ITorHttpClient client, HttpMethod method, HttpStatusCode expectedCode, String relativeUri, Int32 retry, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.WebClients.Wasabi.WasabiClient.GetVersionsAsync(CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.WebClients.Wasabi.WasabiClient.CheckUpdatesAsync(CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.Services.UpdateChecker.ActionAsync(CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.Bases.PeriodicRunner.ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken) 2020-03-29 20:35:01 ERROR WasabiSynchronizer (305) System.NotSupportedException: Invalid StatusLine: ?. - System.IndexOutOfRangeException: Index was outside the bounds of the array. at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.Parse(String statusLineString) --- End of inner exception stack trace --- at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.Parse(String statusLineString) at System.Net.Http.HttpResponseMessageExtensions.CreateNewAsync(Stream responseStream, HttpMethod requestMethod) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpMethod method, String relativeUri, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at TorHttpClientExtensions.SendAndRetryAsync(ITorHttpClient client, HttpMethod method, HttpStatusCode expectedCode, String relativeUri, Int32 retry, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.WebClients.Wasabi.WasabiClient.GetSynchronizeAsync(uint256 bestKnownBlockHash, Int32 count, Nullable`1 estimateMode, CancellationToken cancel) at System.Threading.Tasks.TaskExtensions.WithAwaitCancellationAsync[T](Task`1 me, CancellationToken cancel, Int32 waitForGracefulTerminationMilliseconds) at WalletWasabi.Services.WasabiSynchronizer.<>c__DisplayClass60_0.<b__0>d.MoveNext()
while my config.json is:
json { "Network": "RegTest", "MainNetBackendUriV3": "http://wasabiukrxmkdgve5kynjztuovbg43uxcbcxn6y2okcrsg7gb6jdmbad.onion/", "TestNetBackendUriV3": "http://testwnp3fugjln6vh5vpj7mvq3lkqqwjj3c2aafyu7laxz42kgwh2rad.onion/", "MainNetFallbackBackendUri": "https://wasabiwallet.io/", "TestNetFallbackBackendUri": "https://wasabiwallet.co/", "RegTestBackendUriV3": "http://oqaqivyaxctrp2gix5id4bbd7mav2xt5n4fzqsnwtrhtsmgjhg7sneqd.onion:8333/", "UseTor": true, "StartLocalBitcoinCoreOnStartup": false, "StopLocalBitcoinCoreOnShutdown": true, "LocalBitcoinCoreDataDir": "/Users/my-name-here/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin", "TorSocks5EndPoint": "127.0.0.1:9050", "MainNetBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:8333", "TestNetBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:18333", "RegTestBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:8333", "MixUntilAnonymitySet": 50, "PrivacyLevelSome": 2, "PrivacyLevelFine": 21, "PrivacyLevelStrong": 50, "DustThreshold": "0.00005" }
The environment in which bitcoind runs is here: https://gist.github.com/AryanJ-NYC/78c770f3e918d06e62301f1ebc6fba31 (I would copy and paste but quite long).
I'm 98% sure the error lies in this line of the log: 2020-03-29 20:34:53 ERROR Global (328) System.Net.Internals.SocketExceptionFactory+ExtendedSocketException (61): Connection refused [::ffff:127.0.0.1]:18444. However, I haven't a clue what port regtest normally runs on.
FWIW, main and testnet connect just fine (both nodes also running on my local machine).
submitted by TheWebDevCoach to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Testnet wallet won't load

Hi I am trying to use testnet but the wallet won't load. Tried like 10 times. tried with/without vpn. I am syncing from China.
Config file:
{
"Network": "TestNet",
"MainNetBackendUriV3": "http://wasabiukrxmkdgve5kynjztuovbg43uxcbcxn6y2okcrsg7gb6jdmbad.onion/",
"TestNetBackendUriV3": "http://testwnp3fugjln6vh5vpj7mvq3lkqqwjj3c2aafyu7laxz42kgwh2rad.onion/",
"MainNetFallbackBackendUri": "https://wasabiwallet.io/",
"TestNetFallbackBackendUri": "https://wasabiwallet.co/",
"RegTestBackendUriV3": "http://localhost:37127/",
"UseTor": false,
"StartLocalBitcoinCoreOnStartup": false,
"StopLocalBitcoinCoreOnShutdown": true,
"LocalBitcoinCoreDataDir": "/Users/jeff/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin",
"TorSocks5EndPoint": "127.0.0.1:9050",
"MainNetBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:8333",
"TestNetBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:18333",
"RegTestBitcoinP2pEndPoint": "127.0.0.1:18444",
"MixUntilAnonymitySet": 50,
"PrivacyLevelSome": 2,
"PrivacyLevelFine": 21,
"PrivacyLevelStrong": 50,
"DustThreshold": "0.00000001"
}
the log file is here:
2019-12-25 20:15:58 INFO Program (44) Wasabi GUI started (1d6f97d5-f50c-45aa-adb3-789af0cf8479).
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO Global (163) Config is successfully initialized.
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO TransactionStore (28) MempoolStore.InitializeAsync finished in 16 milliseconds.
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO TransactionStore (28) ConfirmedStore.InitializeAsync finished in 8 milliseconds.
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO AllTransactionStore (27) InitializeAsync finished in 26 milliseconds.
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO Global (225) TorProcessManager is initialized.
2019-12-25 20:15:59 INFO Global (399) Loaded AddressManager from `/Users/jeff/.walletwasabi/client/AddressManageAddressManagerTestNet.dat`.
2019-12-25 20:16:00 INFO IndexStore (43) InitializeAsync finished in 344 milliseconds.
2019-12-25 20:16:00 INFO BitcoinStore (39) InitializeAsync finished in 347 milliseconds.
2019-12-25 20:16:01 INFO HostedServices (49) Started Software Update Checker.
2019-12-25 20:16:01 INFO Global (334) Start connecting to nodes...
2019-12-25 20:16:01 INFO Global (356) Start synchronizing filters...
2019-12-25 20:16:01 INFO MainWindow.xaml (74) UiConfig is successfully initialized.
2019-12-25 20:16:09 INFO Global (703) Wallet loaded: Wallet_electrum.
2019-12-25 20:16:09 INFO Global (487) Start Chaumian CoinJoin service...
2019-12-25 20:16:09 INFO Global (489) Starting WalletService...
2019-12-25 20:16:09 INFO CoinJoinClient (141) CoinJoinClient is successfully initialized.
submitted by recoba8814 to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

I need some help with a paper I am writing about cryptocurrency. I am describing how Bitcoin works and while I checked all of my info I was confused about some parts. Could you help me? (I hope the opinionated parts don't piss anybody off)

Bitcoin is supposedly the first cryptocurrency to be ever created. Bitcoin was introduced in January of 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto. The basic principle behind Bitcoin is quite simple, and becomes increasingly complicated once you dive deeper into it with things like forks, tethers, SegWits etc. Bitcoin in its purest form is a ledger. It's a way to keep track of transactions without technically transfering any money. A good and commonly used example is comparing it to a game of poker. In a game of poker instead of directly giving money or chips, depending on the time, one would simply write down how much each person owes another and at the end of a game tally up and divide and collect all the money. In Bitcoin this ledger is called the blockchain. The blockchain stores all of the info for the transactions; senders public keys, amounts, and receiver's public key. Two important aspects of the blockchain is that its both decentralized and completely public. Decentralized essentially means that all the servers are separately storing this public ledger. No central player has access and can influence it, this insures complete security over the ledger meaning that no one person can change it to so say what they want. Another factor of decentralization is there is, obviously, no central decider. This is very different from a countries currency, fiat currencies, which is controlled by a central figure. The good thing about a centralized currency is that price drops, pump-and-dumps, and crazy growth can all be controlled or at least managed. Bitcoin and most cryptocurrency can not do that. If one person who has a controlling percent of the currency decided to sell it and the price dropped a tremendous amount nothing could be done to help all the people who lost money. Another way that the system protects itself is by having the entire ledger public and many ledger keepers making sure nothing wrong or illicit. These ledger keepers call themselves miners. A good way to visualize this it to go back to the example of the poker table but just change one thing. Previously the group would check and tally up all the money but if we were to place Bitcoin as its example there would be hundreds of miners, or ledger keepers, in the room with us. So if I were to write down that "Vernon owes me 10$" all the ledger checkers would check this transaction and make sure there was no double-spending. In the world of Bitcoin the one job for the ledger checker is divided into two parts; the algorithm that makes sure the transaction is legit and the miners who are checking the verification of a transaction and not necessarily the transaction itself, theses are presented to the miners as puzzles, called hashes. Miners are rewarded for solving every block with some Bitcoin. Most cryptocurrencies today use the blockchain and mining to verify transactions.
submitted by Morty_McFuck to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin September 2019 Development Release/Update!

For a more interactive view of changes, click here
In our current world; bordering on financial chaos, with tariff wars, Brexit and hyperinflation rife, you can count on Groestlcoin to consistently produce innovation that strikes to take the power away from the few and into the many, even after a full five and a half years of solid development.
Here is what the team has already announced in the last 3 months since the last development update:

What's Being Released Today?

Groestl Nodes

What am I?

Groestl Nodes aims to map out and compare the status of the Groestlcoin mainnet and testnet networks. Even though these networks share the same protocol, there is currently no way to directly compare these coins in a single location. These statistics are essential to evaluate the relative health of both networks.

Features

Source - Website

Groestlcoin Transaction Tool

What am I?

This is a tool for creating unsigned raw Groestlcoin transactions and also to verify existing transactions by entering in the transaction hex and converting this to a human-readable format to verify that a transaction is correct before it is signed.

Features

SourceDownload

Groestlcoin AGCore

What am I?

AGCore is an Android app designed to make it easier to run a Groestlcoin Core node on always-on Android appliances such as set-top boxes, Android TVs and repurposed tablets/phones. If you are a non-technical user of Groestlcoin and want an Android app that makes it easy to run a Groestlcoin Core node by acting as a wrapper, then AG Core is the right choice for you.

What's Changed?

Source - Download

Groestlcoin Electrum

What's Changed?

Android Electrum-Specific

OSXWindowsWindows StandaloneWindows PortableLinux - Android
Server SourceServer Installer SourceClient SourceIcon SourceLocale Source

Android Wallet – Including Android Wallet Testnet

What am I?

Android Wallet is a BIP-0032 compatible hierarchial deterministic Groestlcoin Wallet, allowing you to send and receive Groestlcoin via QR codes and URI links.

V7.11.1 Changes

Groestlcoin Java Library SourceSource - DownloadTestnet Download

Groestlwallet

What am I?

Groestlwallet is designed to protect you from malware, browser security holes, even physical theft. With AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, keychain and code signatures, groestlwallet represents a significant security advance over web and desktop wallets, and other mobile platforms.
Simplicity is groestlwallet's core design principle. Because groestlwallet is "deterministic", your balance and entire transaction history can be restored from just your recovery phrase.

iOS 0.7.3 Changes

Android v89 Changes

iOS SourceAndroid Source - Android DownloadiOS Download

Groestlcoinomi Released

What am I?

Groestlcoinomi is a lightweight thin-client Groestlcoin wallet based on a client-server protocol.

Groestlcoinomi v1.1 Desktop Changes

Groestlcoinomi Android v1.6 Changes

Groestlcoin Java Library SourceAndroid Source
Android DownloadWindows DownloadMac OS DownloadLinux Download

Groestlcoin BIP39 Tool

What's Changed?

Source - Download
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

wasabi never reconnects to Bitcoin Core and other issues

About a week ago I transferred some BTC into wasabi and queued it for CoinJoining. It has been a very slow process and it still hasn't finished. How long is it expected to take? And is the balance meant to be ground down into lots of 0.1xxx BTC outputs?
The last couple of nights I've left the wallet running only to wake up in the morning to find that it has made no progress overnight. Both times I see "Local Bitcoin Core disconnected" in the stdout shortly after I left it alone and it never reconnects after that. When I try to shut the wallet down to restart it, it just hangs and I have to explicitly 'kill' it.
Here's the output showing how there was a 9 hour gap shortly after Bitcoin Core disconnected:
2019-05-28 18:57:51 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-28 18:59:14 INFO WalletService: Local Bitcoin Core disconnected. 2019-05-28 18:59:14 WARNING WalletService: System.OperationCanceledException: The operation was canceled. at System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection`1.TryTakeWithNoTimeValidation(T& item, Int32 millisecondsTimeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken, CancellationTokenSource combinedTokenSource) at System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection`1.TryTake(T& item, Int32 millisecondsTimeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken) at System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection`1.Take(CancellationToken cancellationToken) at NBitcoin.Protocol.PollMessageListener`1.ReceiveMessage(CancellationToken cancellationToken) at NBitcoin.Protocol.NodeListener.ReceivePayload[TPayload](CancellationToken cancellationToken) at NBitcoin.Protocol.Node.GetBlocks(IEnumerable`1 neededBlocks, CancellationToken cancellationToken)+MoveNext() at System.Linq.Enumerable.Single[TSource](IEnumerable`1 source) at WalletWasabi.Services.WalletService.GetOrDownloadBlockAsync(uint256 hash, CancellationToken cancel) 2019-05-28 18:59:14 INFO WasabiSynchronizer: Downloaded filter for block 578281. 2019-05-28 18:59:26 INFO CcjClientState: Coin added to the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-28 18:59:26 INFO CcjClientState: Round (8044) registration is cleared. 2019-05-28 18:59:26 ERROR CcjClient: System.Net.Http.HttpRequestException: Not Found Alice not found. at System.Net.Http.HttpResponseMessageExtensions.ThrowRequestExceptionFromContentAsync(HttpResponseMessage me) at WalletWasabi.WebClients.Wasabi.ChaumianCoinJoin.AliceClient.PostConfirmationAsync() at WalletWasabi.Services.CcjClient.TryConfirmConnectionAsync(CcjClientRound inputRegistrableRound) 2019-05-28 19:00:04 WARNING CcjClient: Provided input is not unspent: ...:.... 2019-05-28 19:00:04 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-28 19:00:04 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Failed to register the coin with the coordinator. The coin is already spent. 2019-05-28 19:00:34 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Registered 1 inputs. 2019-05-28 19:00:34 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-28 19:00:39 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-28 19:01:07 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-28 19:01:18 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. [...] 2019-05-28 19:05:53 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-28 19:06:02 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-28 19:06:28 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Confirmed connection. Phase: InputRegistration. 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:06 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO AliceClient: Round (8044), Alice (...): Unconfirmed connection. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClientState: Coin added to the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClientState: Round (8044) registration is cleared. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClientState: Coin removed from the waiting list: ...:.... 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO CcjClient: Coin dequeued: ...:.... Reason: Closing Wasabi. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO UiConfig: UiConfig is saved. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO Global: KeyManager backup saved to /home/.../.walletwasabi/client/WalletBackups/Wallet0.json. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO Global: WalletService is stopped. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO Global: ChaumianClient is stopped. 2019-05-29 04:09:13 INFO Global: UpdateChecker is stopped. [1]+ Stopped wassabee $ kill %1 [1]+ Terminated wassabee 
Other times I see the balance dropping considerably, only to go back up when I restart the wallet.
One time I saw this error, about 'Index out of range':
2019-05-28 18:04:37 ERROR WasabiSynchronizer: System.NotSupportedException: Invalid StatusLine: ?. - System.ArgumentOutOfRangeException: Index was out of range. Must be non-negative and less than the size of the collection. Parameter name: index at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.CreateNew(String statusLineString) --- End of inner exception stack trace --- at WalletWasabi.Http.Models.StatusLine.CreateNew(String statusLineString) at System.Net.Http.HttpResponseMessageExtensions.CreateNewAsync(Stream responseStream, HttpMethod requestMethod) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.TorSocks5.TorHttpClient.SendAsync(HttpMethod method, String relativeUri, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at TorHttpClientExtensions.SendAndRetryAsync(TorHttpClient client, HttpMethod method, HttpStatusCode expectedCode, String relativeUri, Int32 retry, HttpContent content, CancellationToken cancel) at WalletWasabi.WebClients.Wasabi.WasabiClient.GetSynchronizeAsync(uint256 bestKnownBlockHash, Int32 count, Nullable`1 estimateMode, CancellationToken cancel) at System.Threading.Tasks.TaskExtensions.WithAwaitCancellationAsync[T](Task`1 me, CancellationToken cancel, Int32 waitForGracefulTermination) at WalletWasabi.Services.WasabiSynchronizer.<>c__DisplayClass84_0.<b__0>d.MoveNext() 
Should I be making github issues each time I see weird behavior from wasabi, or is it already known that there are lots of problems with it? Am I doing something wrong to be having such an unstable experience with the wallet? I downloaded "Wasabi-1.1.4.deb".
submitted by dooglus to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

[Venezuela] The Bitcoin Standard as a reference for Exchange. Real adoption.

Due to hyperinflation and the collapse of the Venezuelan economy, Cryptocurrency specially Bitcoin has been a way out to leave the country economically without having to leave physically.
We don't have official data of exchange by the government since they try to hide the Inflation and put make up on the numbers. Who do we trust to tell us how much is a USD worth in our useless Fiat currency?
For a couple of years now we used to have websites like dolartoday, telling us daily "This is the price", they used to claim that the price depended on the market, yet they are a centralized entity there was no indicators that proved so. Today we see a new Value including in these websites.
"Bitcoin Dollar" Is a reference now, while its value can be different than CASH usd in the market, it's an allusion to the Bitcoin Standard, the value of Exchange USD/Bolivares changes with Bitcoin drops and rises, as any market, when Bitcoin is rising people want to get rid of their Bolivares therefore they buy Bitcoin, people sell at high prices increasing the value of the USD and Bitcoin in Bolivares.
The point is: Bitcoin is a reference of the value of our currency, as devaluated as it is, it is the only reliable source we can trust, that's how adoption begins, this is why Venezuela is so relevant to Cryptocurrencies, you can see them take action here day by day.
Any question AMA.
References
Edit:
More References:
submitted by deimerx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to get free BCH, BTG, BTX, CLAM, SBTC, BCD, BTP and BTN and cash them out

*EDIT: a new version of this guide, multilingual and featuring a wallet checker (input your IP, see what you can fork and how much it is worth) is available at https://cryptodom.org *

Dear you all! I have been following closely the airdrops and especially the forks of the last month or so, and I am proud to announce I have just successfully claimed (&cashed) my BTF and my BTW. After claiming (&cashing), in order, BCH, BTG, BTX, CLAM, SBTC, BCD. Like most of you, if you are reading this, I am still looking for a solution for B2X, and I have also claimed but have so far been unable to cash out BTP and BTN.
*EDIT: Now created, transferred and cashed B2X, BTP and BTN - See EDIT at the end of the post
While doing all this, I did notice a couple of things: 1- It is extremely hard to find proper information about the forks (here’s a good starting point though: https://btcdiv.com/ ) 2- There are significant security risks involved with these procedures
I will try my best to try and explain you what I did, while also offering a service to do it for you for a fair fee if you still can’t do it/don’t feel safe doing it.
Here we go:
INTRO Before you start this, ask yourself a very important question: do I understand what I am doing? If the answer is YES, then you should have your private keys and you are good to skip the intro. Let me try to make this short and easy: you have some bitcoins, somewhere. In some cases you have direct access to the keys (LEDGER*, blockchain…), in other instances you don’t (crypto held on exchanges). If you DO have access to those keys, you need to do two extremely important things:
1- Write it down 2- Move your whole balance to another wallet/address
Please note that if you fail to implement number 2, any hacker claiming to “do this for you” will steal your bitcoins. As simple as that. No matter what you are claiming, taking the risk won’t be worth it, so MOVE YOUR BITCOINS from the address you stored the private keys of.
PART 1/a - CLAIMING - COINOMI (BCH, BTG, BTX, CLAM)
Please note: how much you can claim depends on how much was on the wallet you will be sweeping from at the time of the fork. Considering that the blockchain is free for everyone to explore, you can figure this out easily. In most cases, a blockchain explorer could help you know how much your keys are worth before you sweep them. Be aware that the maths are MORE OR LESS these: are you holding 5+ BTC since 2017 (the further the better)? Congrats, you are in for some real money. Conversely, if you have been holding <1 bitcoin you are probably just losing your time as whatever you’ll get won’t meet the thresholds for minimum transfers anyway (unless we are talking BTG and BCH, good luck with that).
Download COINOMI on your android (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.coinomi.wallet) Open coinomi and set it up (create a wallet and write down details, thank yourself later) Now add BCH, BTG, BTX, CLAM as coins to your wallet and then claim them one by one in the same order To claim, go inside the coin’s screen and click the three dots on the top right of the page —> Sweep wallet (repeat for all coins)
PART 1/b - CLAIMING - BITHER (SBTC, BCD, BTF, BTW, BTP, BTN)
Download these two apps on your android: BITHER, BITPIE (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.bither / https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bitpie) Open and setup both apps (create a wallet and write down details, thank yourself later) Now open BITHER and click the settings icon (top right), then ADVANCED OPTIONS —> IMPORT PRIVATE KEY —> FROM PRIVATE KEY TEXT (Important; use the "FROM PRIVATE KEY TEXT" option, NOT the one with the BITHER key!) to claim, go ADVANCED OPTIONS —> GET FORK COINS and take it from there (your private keys should have been imported and should show you how much they have on them (SBTC, BCD, BTF, BTW, BTP, BTN) At this point, all you need to do is to tell BITHER to transfer the free coins to a corresponding BITPIE address
PART 1/c - CLAIMING - DIG WALLETING SERVICES (UNTESTED) (BCH,BTG,SBTC,BCD,BTF,UBTC,B2X,BCX) Today I also chanced upon a site ( https://bitcoinforks.io/ ) , which gives a nice picture of the forks. Apparently, they also have an automatic “digger” that charges 10% to transfer the forked coins to a (fork) wallet of your choice. I have tried to test with UTBC but it told me I had no coins, which might actually be true. Some users on bitcointalk report success, so feel free to try with small amounts and see if it works for you. Please note they take a commission on the CLAIMING part, while, at least to my understanding, COINOMI and BITHER do not (even though BITHER forces you to transfer to a BITPIE address).
PART 2 - CASHING OUT
If you got this far and you now have a balance in any of the coins above, you should immediately transfer the “real” coins (BCH/BTG) out to a reputable exchange/wallet (not that I do not trust Coinomi but you never know), and try to convert the rest to a proper coin before moving it in bulk to an address of your choice. Apart from Coinomi, this is where it gets tricky. A lot of those coins are only listed on some obscure Chinese exchanges and it’s hard to even understand what the value of the coin is since it varies widely from one to the other. Some of those coins MIGHT one day make it to a major exchange, granted, but personally I couldn’t wait to dump all of them (I regret doing so with BTX though). So I went through the whole verification/blind trust process required by the shady sites and… I got my free coins converted into actual BTC/LTC. On that note, it must be noted that not content with applying daylight robbery fees the exchanges also require a minimum amount for you to be able to withdraw (and a verification with ID in some cases). Here is what I did and how it went: I got accounts on GATE.IO - BIT-Z.COM - BTCTRADE.IM* and somewhat made my money get out of there and safely into my ledger. Would I recommend those exchanges? Well… Personally I have nothing but praise for GATE.IO and BIT-Z.COM - They accepted my transfers speedily and I could trade and withdraw easily - no verification needed. As for BTCTRADE.IM, it did require verification and is by far the slowest of them all, but since I got money out (in the end) I can’t complain for the time being.
Note: problems getting verified with btctrade.com? Read this : https://www.reddit.com/BitcoinAirdrops/comments/7qqxv4/guide_claiming_and_dumping_bitcoin_faith_btf_fo
PART 3 - DO YOU NEED HELP? Some of you will laugh at my deal, since they are smart, tech savvy and are running several nodes of all the existing forked chains from a computer in their basement, interacting with the exchanges via API only. However, I expect the vast majority of you to be able to arrive to part 2 but then get stuck at moving the money to the Chinese exchanges. Let me reiterate that they worked for me, so I’d generally recommend them. In case you do NOT want to try and get through that yourself, I would like to help! Here is how:
PM to get in touch Transfer the forked coins to my bitpie/btctrade/gate.io/coinex addresses Wait for me to receive, transfer to the exchange, change it into LTC/BTC/BCH and send it back to you, minus a fee**
Please note that some transfers take time, and this is independent of me. I will, however, send you all the transaction details as I do the operations so that you can track it yourself.
*QUICK REMINDERS: BTCTRADE.IM withdrawal fee: btc: 0.001 BCH: 0.001
BITPIE EXCHANGE: BTF/BTW need 120 confirmations to transfer from bitpie to the exchange (my first BTF transfer took nearly 32 hours, BTW took 20)- you will be able to monitor that from your own bitpie wallet and you can ping me when it hits the magic number.
GATE.IO and BIT-Z.COM are faster (10+ confirmations I think) so I should use them if possible (depending on coin deposit availability).
**FEES You can check the value of the coins on the exchanges to get a rough idea of how much your coins are worth - I will send you all the transactions anyway but please do your research. Sometimes coins have high value on exchanges where deposits are not accepted, for instance, and tend to drop sharply in value as soon as the gates are opened. Depending on how much I will be moving for you, these are my fees: 5% (>2000 USD worth) 10% (between 500 and 1999 USD worth) 50 USD (<500 USD worth)
Oh and one last thing… Why would you trust me? If nothing, for the simple reason that I honestly told you exactly HOW to get the forked money and through which exchanges I cashed it out. I simply wrote the post that I wish I had found when I started doing this, and I hope that some of you will be lazy enough to use me for the most complicated part of the deal, giving me something in the process. If I get nothing out of it, I will be fine and happy to have spread some knowledge anyway!
EDIT 1 - 12:48 GMT 25-01-2018
I have tried DIG WALLETING (affiliate link: https://dig.walleting.services/#/aff/o5YP75ALDORdaAbmrJJx NON affiliate link: https://dig.walleting.services/#) and they did a great job. The hard part, as usual, was to have a proper address to transfer them to. Anyway... Now claimed and cashed UBTC as well as B2X (btctrade.im & exrates.me respectively - thanks #hniball)
Bither & Bitpie opened the exchange (on Bitpie). The process is a bit convoluted and you need to transfer the money in and out of the "pie bank" in order to dump. Prices are tanking fast and it takes hours to even transfer the money. Astronomical fees, but it worked and I cashed out BTP and BTF in BCH. Fun fact: I thought I had 5k USD in BTP (according to the BITPIE wallet). They eventually turned out to be 0.05 BCH (Thanks, BITPIE exchange). Reality check...
Given what I know now, I'd advise to use DIG WALLETING to send the forkcoins directly to my BITPIE addresses if you want me to do it for you (or send me the seed once you have emptied the wallet, that would work too). But, as usual, you are more than welcome to do it on your own.
IF I HELPED YOU, YOU CAN TIP ME HERE:
•BTC tip jar: 1BEAADXCk3ng2ZRsinHmwVyZQf1Vu9AcDj
•LTC tip jar: LYT1sbotLuUtU5v5r9uEu61xoGpJ1s4aau
EDIT 2 - 01:21 GMT 5-03-2018
Here is more explanations about the forks: A cryptoforker's guide to free money
submitted by crytposhadow to BitcoinAirdrops [link] [comments]

How to construct a transaction completely offline?

Imagine I'm in a prison and I only have a computer with a few megabytes of data left. I cannot download the whole blockchain (24.5 GB as of today) on my computer just to sign one transaction. External nodes aren't working because of buggy wallets I tried for hours. It's fairly possible to do this for bitcoin online:
  1. https://coinb.in/#newTransaction Also offline, what if I don't have any data left:
  2. https://www.codeproject.com/Articles/1151054/Create-a-Bitcoin-transaction-by-hand
And also by hand, because my warden took my computer, and some prisoners are passing me papers with unspent outputs and stuff. I only have to sign:
3. http://www.righto.com/2014/02/bitcoins-hard-way-using-raw-bitcoin.html
I can't do any of this in monero why? I know there must be a way, just don't know how the tx is constructed. bro I need to long all my monero with 25X leverage now.(serious, I'm gonna do it. right after i know how to do this one transaction. I just cannot download the blockchain. I'm in a jiffy here.)
From what I see:
There exists a online transaction hash checker
 https://xmrchain.net/tx/ac5711eef809b9dd065f98c188057cf8ed7387b8aa80a15d820edbf54991cb54 
I verified my tx, using my private viewkey and address I got the moneroj which are unspent. I want to spend it, how?
I also see theres a tx pusher on that same site, and some other tools. Could someone explain how to use these tools in a step-by-step process?
submitted by DividedCryptanalysis to Monero [link] [comments]

Blue Beelzebub (Part 1)

For years, years, I wondered – ‘why me’ – you know, you know, kiddo – ‘why me’ – but there is no ‘why me’. What? As if there were, you know, ‘chosens’, there’s no ‘chosens’ – there’s no all–seeing, all–knowing powerful nothing. It happened. That’s it. I fell for it. I took its bait – hook, line, sinker. Didn’t I do it to myself? Wasn’t I the sucker? There’s no ‘why me’ – and once I realized that, that there was no, that there was no, no any kind of justice what so ever, until I acted, that gave my existence purpose. And now I’m gonna fulfill that purpose. I don’t want you getting involved. You’re deep enough as it is. Don’t be the sucker!
– Bobby Mortaren; famous last words
I raced from the house to the hotel, at Walsenburg, where I struggled to make sense of everything that transpired. I poured myself over notes and records that I had brought along. Only my laptop’s glow illuminated the room. Every so often lights through I-25 swept across the bed. Every so often breezes stirred trees around the perimeter. Soon midnight passed. The world darkened, relaxing as it were into slumber.
A knock rattled the door - and I could have shrieked if it weren’t for what remained of my nerves. All of a sudden, I felt so icy, so cold, that I stood, frozen, uncertain of how to proceed. Who was it? It couldn’t be good. Not the FBI. Not the Thules. Ache, already?
I balked at chucking my laptop - whoever they were at the door, they’d find it, they’d find it.
It’s the 21st century; evidence doesn’t vanish without a trace.
As my heart pounded my chest, I reached that door and cracked it a notch. I braced for the kick certain to follow. It didn’t come. The hotel’s courtyard / lot spread, deserted except for my rented Wrangler. There wasn’t anyone - anyone who may have been my visitor.
Yet - by my feet - at the edge of the threshold - my visitor had left a box.
I poked at it with my pole and turned it over and over. It wasn’t postmarked. It wasn’t addressed. It had been delivered by hand and, suspecting what it was, I yanked it inside. Leaning onto and drooping against the door, I tore its lid. The box contained two floppies, a CD, and a stack paper. It was Blue Beelzebub - all of it, every part of it. As well as instructions: a How-To-Guide for destroying your future, fetched onto my doorstep, white-glove-style to boot, as promised. It may as well have been a bomb.
###
How did Blue Beelzebub mutate into my obsession?
Worse - did I expect to find its truth remarked into code from 1996? 1996! There wasn’t a lot to the internet way, way back when. But crime was crime no matter its era. Was it crime? And did the game start this way or that way then evolve into crime? Was it crime from its start?
The programmer of Blue Beelzebub, a hacker by the avatar ‘ZuZu’, claimed to be legit. Their MO had been to create games not scams. Or so it appeared until Blue Beelzebub entered the story. If it were a product of malware, why had ZuZu devoted so much of their effort into its creation? Why had they boasted of the game’s nitty gritty details during its gestation? Why all of that trouble, if only a fraction of it would have been appreciated by those who played it? Even LVN, when they weren’t laundering bitcoin, expressed what may be described as passion for that game.
Was it a game?
By 1996 standards, its demos parlayed atrocious graphics and threadbare mechanics. The way it affected the player’s rig ensured nobody would be eager to replay it. The game passed every scan available yet it twisted the OS and hijacked the PC to serve as a node, a link into a yet-unknown and yet-unnamed network for purposes every bit as mysterious as the game itself.
As I contemplated the reality of the situation, I settled onto the notion that that game may have been a gimmick to cover truly malevolent intentions. That had been the crux of LVN’s KickStarter and GoFundMe rackets - they always proposed plausible if lofty projects as if they were real, actual products people buy. However, case after case demonstrated that their pretense unraveled after scrutiny. Could it be, as far back as 1996, the creator(s) of Blue Beelzebub conceived of such a deception? FPS (of the type Blue Beelzebub reported to be) were the rage through the 90s. If so then their MO resembled that of a typical bait-and-switch scheme - bait them with a game, switch them with a virus. Then? What? Profit?
###
In the summer of 2017, Czech authorities in conjunction with the EU, arrested LVN at their apartment south of Plzen. They seized the hacker’s laptop, PC, as well as their twenty thousand CD library. LVN was a hacker-for-fire; evidence presented at their arraignment demonstrated to the court that they had been paid by Russian and other Eastern European actors to pilfer bitcoin wallets. In addition to theft, the court entertained charges connected to a NiceHash heist of 64 million euros earlier that year.
It was the breach of NiceHash’s security that brought my skills to the EU’s attention. For a few weeks, between March and May, I played my part to aid the investigation and the conviction of its mastermind. We discovered that the breach had been directed from inside NiceHash. We split the work: ‘brick and mortar’ detectives ran interviews and stakeouts while my fellow ‘white-hats’ and I toiled at the forensics. To meet our end of the bargain, we created a model of that cyber-attack, in order to construct and deconstruct its operation. As we realized how the crime had been executed, we identified the party responsible for it and built the authorities a solid chain-of-evidence - a chain-of-evidence that identified LVN as the perpetrator.
LVN masterminded not just that NiceHash heist but a dozen scams at sites like KickStarter and GoFundMe. LVN traded exclusively through bitcoin. Their MO was to sow fake projects then to reap real funds submitted by backers - by backers who aimed to launder money via its exchange into bitcoin. Projects were advertised to those who sought the service; they were fraudulent through and through yet they appeared real enough to fool the maintainers of those sites and the public at large who may have been tricked by the scams.
Under the supervision of the investigation at large, I pledged my dollars to a few of LVN’s projects, to see what the response would be. Soon, LVN and I exchanged emails. They wanted to speak face-to-face. In front of the experts, I played to type and gained access to a roster of services from that hacker-for-hire. As a result of the communication, the investigation brought into play anti trafficking & exploiting agencies from around the world and accelerated their goal to convict LVN.
One of the projects LVN advertised didn’t fit into the mold in so far as it felt like a genuine hobby of theirs. LVN sought investors to fund their (re)development of a game, Blue Beelzebub. The project listed at KickStarter - removed but saved to my laptop - included a lightbox of images and demos as well as snippets of code. It discussed such esoterics as: updates to its physics engine and its video & audio renderer; upgrades to its arsenal and its gallery of foes; changing its play - expanding its levels and ditching its linearity.
The details impressed me as they perplexed me. Why? I kept asking. What’s the idea? What’s the racket? Why create a game using twenty year old technology? I understood its esoterics perfectly for I came of age during the 90s. So much of what went into Blue Beelzebub felt familiar as it was familiar. An FPS - first person shooter - propelled by a fork of that fabled, 2.5D DOOM engine. Little wonder that its caps parlayed the look and feel of classic 90s PC games!
Maybe it was yet another scam? Or - maybe - it was a hobby of a gamer / programmer? Could it be that LVN recalled those early DOS games and wanted to re-create the era? But that wasn’t everything. And as I mused & Googled I started to ask myself if there wasn’t more about Blue Beelzebub beyond the haze of my nostalgia. I failed to connect the dots although that did not shake the deja vu - somehow, someway, I recognized that game.
###
Escape published my article about LVN’s conviction. Against the advice of my editor, I stalked its commentary, to see what, if anything, the story drew out of the woodwork. Its aside re: Blue Beelzebub attracted attention. I wasn’t surprised, to be honest, as I had inserted it into the text to draw reaction. And my rouse worked! But I wasn’t the only one who felt deja vu about the game.
A commentator, who asked for anonymity, posted a link to 4CHAN about Blue Beelzebub. LVN had advertized the KickStarter for the game at a group devoted to indie developers. LVN never advertized their work at 4CHAN out of fear of exposure. So that thread where they didn’t ask for money confirmed my sense that it wasn’t, necessarily, a scam.
As I scanned that thread, however, I realized what a rabbit-hole the business would be. After LVN’s post, anonymous replies went to and fro as they typically do. Then the tenor of the thread devolved into a war amongst those who were for vs. those who were against what LVN proposed to do with the game. It was a question about credit. At last - somebody revealed a truth I duly suspected of - that Blue Beelzebub wasn’t the work of LVN - that the game as it existed predated LVN by twenty years or so.
The idea for Blue Beelzebub had floated about USENET c. 1995. The majority of the conversations extracted from the archives suggested that the game was vaporware. Its supporters countered that either a P/C or a DEMO existed and that a play-through had been uploaded to (early) YouTube. Everyone who added their opinion - pro & con - agreed that it was “inspired by Satan”, “took its cues from Crowley’s ‘Thelema’“, and that it included clips “replete with ever more corrupt” gore and snuff. A self-described player, whose rig they claimed had been “totaled” by the game, stated bluntly that it contained a “Chinese Sandwich”.
Undeterred by the confusion, I kept at my search, ramming through the archives, pushing my way further back in time, from 1997 to 1995. USENET had been mirrored prior to its collapse yet its content was not indexed completely; a robust query of its posts required force and patience.... In spite of the odds, my effort worked, my persistence located the roots of Blue Beelzebub.
It was a posted dated June 15, 1995 written by the game’s originator, a hacker by the name of ZuZu. According to their missive, they claimed to have produced “a proof of concept demo” for their “latest and greatest” game, Blue Beelzebub, and that it was “a legit game catering to those who worship and admire Lucifer and everything that stands for”. ZuZu listed, point by point, the substance of their creation. I wasn’t surprised to see, splattered across that post, the verbiage LVN usurped for their own advert.
Except - they weren’t seeking funding. According to their missive, the game had been bankrolled “by entities of a foreign sort, who don’t want to be credited”. Rather, they were seeking “experts” willing to alpha & beta test the product.
Blue Beelzebub and by extension ZuZu went rouge between 1997 and 2005.
Then - October 31, 2005 - ZuZu submitted their last, known public statement. Broadcasted through their usual, over-the-top flamboyance, they wished for their “fans to learn and spread the word” that they “secured an exclusive”. They had convinced a devote of indie horror / FPS games to review Blue Beelzebub. The player they had snagged was famous for their day and their name I recognized as I read it.
Bobby Mortaren - an internet pioneer par excellence. Mixing reviews and play-throughs together, his format had been lauded as visionary and just as imitated. Tweaked a bit by-the-by it continued to find use. His name, though, hadn’t been spoken of for a decade. Games had changed. Tastes had changed. He could have shifted into yet another venture so far as I knew.
Mortaren posted his works to YouTube - to YouTube prior to its merger with Alphabet. As I considered the changes that transpired across the years, I wasn’t surprised to discover that all of my links to his works were dead. Eerily, though, it was impossible to locate his reviews directly via YouTube. So I tried Google and Bing. No result. Ditto with DuckDuckGo. Ditto with Wiki, SlideShare, BoardReader. Out of desperation I surfed into the remnants of Alta Vista - maybe its database saved the information? No. No. Futile - all of it.
YouTube’s size was greater than USENET’s size. My task’s extent was altogether a colossal order of magnitude. If that which I pursued had not been deleted, then, it would be found ad finem omnia. So to dig further I opted for a quick & dirty hack - a bot. A bot scripted to sift and sort all YouTube’s content that matched keywords Mortaren and Blue Beelzebub. I ran it and waited for days then for weeks then for months.
###
My extensive search corroborated the fact that Mortaren left the internet c. 2006. Assuming they may have continued via pseudonym, I enquired into the matter with colleagues who devoted themselves to games and / or to reviews. Only a few recognized their name; nobody was cognizant of their voice.
An editor from ToplessRobot directed my attention to a defunct fansite’s messageboard where somebody asked why Mortaren vanished without a trace. To my shock, the reply was that Mortaren had been arrested by the FBI c. 2006. I could not fathom why. Nevertheless, if the revelation were correct, then, the resolution to the matter was tantalizingly viable. Arrests - and trials - were public.
The LVN / EU case brought my forensic skills to the notice of the DOJ and the Treasury / Secret Service. The FBI, like its European counterparts, wanted to understand everything about bitcoin and how it might (might) be possible to trace transactions to individuals.
As part of my freelance work, I already met and debriefed FBI agents re: the Czech hacker. Eventually ‘large’ talk gave way to ‘small’ talk amongst us. It was at that juncture that I broached the subject of Blue Beelzebub - namely, that LVN hatched a scheme to defraud investors (via bitcoin) ostensibly by promising to develop an update to that game.
“They got exposed by players who recognized the game’s ill-repute,” I stated. “Apparently, the game’s infamy started after its reviewer, a fellow by the name of - er - Robby Mortaren? Bobby Mortaren? Well - they got arrested by the FBI.”
Neither the game nor the reviewer elicited a reply - immediately, anyhow.
A (censored) document, summarizing a DOJ investigation, worked its way into my mailbox. Mortaren had been under FBI surveillance from November 2005 to May 2006. Why wasn’t stated; just that the FBI obtained search warrants for computers & electronics. A federal judge issued an arrest warrant May 30, 2006; however, the DOJ withdrew the charges after Mortaren agreed to an immunity deal. Mortaren turned star witness at a trial that involved organized crime as well as rackets, cults, ritualized human & civil rights abuses and elements that suggested Satanism. The perpetrator(s) that the DOJ wanted to convict fled either to South America OR Eastern Europe / Central Asia. The trial evaporated; neither the charges nor the perpetrator(s) were detailed.
Mortaren’s immunity deal with the DOJ wasn’t negotiable or retractable and included a complete internet ban.
The document listed a PO BOX as Mortaren’s permanent address.
To Mr. B. Mortaren:
Sir, I apologize. Blue Beelzebub. Were it not for the fact that you may be the only person left to recall that game, I would not have stretched my resources so thin to find you. If you are not able to assist my research, is anyone?
I was part of an EU investigation re: bitcoin, theft & fraud, as well as trafficking & exploiting vagrants. Through that investigation I came into contact with a hacker; they claimed to be working on Blue Beelzebub; they sought funds to upgrade it. While disturbing to say the least, that game did not strike me as part of the hacker’s MO. So I pried further into the matter and discovered, to my astonishment, that Blue Beelzebub dated to the mid 90s and that you reviewed & posted the demo at YouTube.
I am curious about that game. I cannot get it out of my head. Who was the programmer? Who was the developer? Where did they get the money? What were their goals? What was the game about, if the game was about anything?
A DOJ document summarizing your immunity from prosecution was brought to my attention. I suspected, as I matched the timeframe of the FBI’s surveillance and arrest, to the demo, that these matters are related. I was not able to find a link, due to the fact that all records, transcripts, etc., were sealed by request of the FBI.
If, for any reason what so ever, we cannot communicate about this matter, would it be possible to contact a surrogate or anybody with the information I seek?
With All Due Respect
JK
###
Due to limits that existed at YouTube’s debut, videos posted from 2005 to 2010 were capped to 10 minutes. Both image and sound playback quality were kept low to spare bandwidth. A lack of (accessible) software and hardware to edit video forced vloggers to improvise. Mortaren had always used a webcam and mic from the 90s to shot their videos ‘live’, i.e., without edits.
YouTube retained the majority of Mortaren’s content; however, after a check of the dates and the poster’s IDs, I determined that Mortaren’s videos had been reposted c. 2006 by another user.
If the titles / numbers were correct then there were seven parts to the demo Mortaren recorded for Blue Beelzebub. Of seven, six remained. Specifically, the 5ifth - which must have been filmed as evidenced by the discontinuity between 4ourth and 6ixth - defied my ability to trace.
The reposter stated that “the 5ifth wasn’t part of the review package”. Yet, as I perused copies of replies they had saved, commentary that referenced material that doesn’t appear anywhere else, I strongly suspected that a 5ifth had been posted for a while and, for whatever reason, Mortaren removed it prior to 2006.
1irst - details facts re: the game: the developer, the programmer, the system requirements, etc.
“If your rig’s able to run DOOM, Blue Beelzebub works,” they state then add: “although, prepare yourselves, kiddos, the game takes a very, very long time to install”.
Passingly, he adds that a fan of his had ditched the game after they experienced “a catastrophic system failure” that they blamed “on either a bug or a virus or both”.
The executable and its auxiliary files pass every virus and malware checker Mortaren throws at it.
2econd & 3hird - demonstrates the game play or what passes for it.
Mortaren prefers to record his reviews live so that his fans experience the game exactly as he does. His videos contain hints / cheats if they are discovered as he plays. He describes Blue Beelzebub as a DOOM-GUY-ESQUE player who moves through an enshadowed monochromatic maze.
“There’s no backwards, I, I, I don’t believe it! Did they forget to give us backwards? There’s forwards and left, right. Kiddos, you gotta do a circle to go backwards.” He continues to berate the game, adding: “Yeah, there’s only forwards. And you know, I gotta say it, the programmer may think they’re the money’s nuts for it.... But it’s so weird that going forwards causes the view to bob up and down or side to side. What’re they trying to do? Are they trying to replicate a player’s gait? Takes me right out of the game. Let me tell y’all why. Like I said, the programmer’s got to be thinking they’re the monkey’s nuts but it’s that bizarro attention to detail that’s so jarring as I consider the lack of detail given to the graphics. Guys. Guys. Guys. You gotta think about what you present.”
Mortaren piles his criticism of the graphics and the sounds, comparing both unfavorably to DOOM. Especially frustrating is the invariance of the black & white textures throughout the maze. He praises the response of the maze to the player as he notes, while attempting to draw the maze, that its passages shift at random. Then more and more criticisms were strewn at the game, including its lack of weaponry, its lack of powerups / extras, its lack of anything.
“A game can’t be about going through the maze, guys, there’s got to be a point - something to do!” Finally, he voices the suspicion that he had been duped by ZuZu.
4ourth - the demo gets interesting.
Mortaren finds an area of the maze where the textures differ. The video’s pixilation - perhaps due to the webcam - perhaps due to the way the reposter preserved it - masks the bulk of the alteration. I detect a change of shade, though, from black & white to blue.
“Well it can’t be for nothing that the wall is blue. Jeez!” As he cracks the joke, to his shock (an explicative slips), the sounds became those of “eerie, drone-like notes fading into reverb” and the monitor displays a still-shot. Mortaren zooms into the image; I recognize it as coming from the shock-site, ROTTEN.
After that alteration, every blue-hued texture Mortaren faces produces other images, increasingly nihilistic and graphic, usually of the dead or the dying, often of celebrities, suicides, accidents, wrecks.
5ifth - ?
6ixth - the segment starts at an awkward jump.
It must have been split from the 5ifth video and while Mortaren does not state why, explicitly, the tone of the voice suggests that something serious transpired.
“Sorry, kiddos, I turned the webcam away - a first - I guess this ZuZu accomplished something.”
When he returns the webcam to the monitor, it is apparent that in addition to tone the substance of the game itself altered.
The player stands at the center of a room Mortaren describes as “a vault with a hole at its floor”. The 2.5D renderer prevents the player from gazing inside the hole. But by directing the player to walk the hole’s circumference it is possible to catch bits of its contents. A sharp, blue light shoots out of the hole; the way it cast light at the ceiling suggests there might have been “water”, as if the hole were a well of sorts.
What shocks Mortaren is that the room fills with children. The renderings of faces make each of the children unique. However: “the ghastliness of the imagery resembles how faces voxilate like with Delta Force games”. Further, he notes, after a pause that echoes my own consternation and trepidation, “I’ve seen these kids. Yeah, I’ve seen these kids from those, those photographs the game stopped everything to show us. Jeez!”
The children stand statue-like as the player walks about them. They serve as obstacles that block movement, otherwise, inert, unresponsive, “not that the player interacts with the kids as there’s no other keys available except A, W, D”.
The video continues, then, Mortaren shrieks.
The playback jostles as if it were about to stop. When everything resettles, he speaks, calmly and evenly, that “there’s a kid that’s different ... animated. You gotta see it, kiddos, I can’t say if it’s awful because it’s awful or if it’s awful because it’s awful....” The webcam zooms into the monitor; the child rendering appears to show it breathing, haphazardly, with their mouth agape. And then, then the child moves and the player like the viewer alike slip an explicative. “I take it back, everything, this is truly and utterly awful.”
7eventh - the coda feels like the set’s longest but is the shortest.
“Right now I’m running. I don’t have a weapon, jeez! I’m running as fast as this keyboard allows but my health is shrinking.” Mortaren stops and rotates the player to face backwards. The animated child is behind and striking the player using a technique that resembles “Hanna-Barbera laziness - or who knows - who knows, kiddos, it could be part of the style”. Just as it is with DOOM, as the player’s health decreases, the view gets redder and the avatar gets bloodier. Mortaren aims into the maze; there is no exit, there is no weapon, no upgrade to assist, all that exists is the floor where the player drops, dead.
The 7eventh adds a post-script recorded after the demo. It shows Mortaren’s PC, open and split to pieces. “The game installed a virus,” he declared then described its symptoms.
“Immediately upon my player’s death, the PC rebooted. After the BIOS, instead of going into DOS, it starts a telnet session and tries to connect via IP. Of course it doesn’t get a reply since my PC uses dial-up. So it freezes, pinging and pinging a server somewhere that it cannot reach.”
Mortaren concludes by theorizing that if Blue Beelzebub were a virus, it must have been designed to target high-end systems with LAN / Ethernet ports.
I jot the IP and attempt to connect to it. Strangely, it will not load yet it will not issue an error of any kind. Chrome, FireFox, Edge, etc., freeze. WHOIS is not able to resolve the owner. Nevertheless, it yields the location of the server, a site approximately 50 miles north east of Trinidad, Colorado.
I reject the result; users of tracers already know that they rely on ISP databases to match IP / location - and how often are those databases updated? - and how often are those updates distributed? The decade that passed between today and the video, and between the video and the creation, assures that there must have been a drift re: the location of the IP.
###
I will not reveal the particulars of when, where, and how I received the call.
“The coordinates.” Into my ear spoke a voice that my investigation made familiar. “Check the coordinates.”
“Coordinates?”
“Blue Beelzebub.”
“Yes,” I replied and Mortaren implied we’d meet.
Mortaren had traced my whereabouts through the blogosphere. He wanted to talk about the game yet feared the government “and or others” eavesdropping. I admitted off-handedly that as I sunk into my work with the DOJ, my paranoia tipped.
“What’s the deal with the game, anyway?”
“What do you want on your Chinese Sandwich?”
My impression settled onto a mixture of intrigue and trepidation. The matter felt so cryptic as to defy credulity. Coordinates? Blue Beelzebub. Chinese Sandwich? Nevertheless, even as we talked (brief as the conversation was) I put together that by coordinates + Blue Beelzebub Mortaren referred to the IP the game telnet’ed.
submitted by 0fruitjack0 to nosleep [link] [comments]

List of UK organisations who take Bitcoin

I have set up this thread to record all the UK organisations that are taking Bitcoin. This first post will be regularly edited to keep the list up to date.
I find it frustrating that I cannot spend my BTC in more places in the UK! So I have personally been targeting local organisations to tell them about Bitcoin and provide them with support to start accepting it; many of the names listed here are a direct result of my efforts mainly in Brighton and London.
I hope this list will encourage other organisations in the UK to start accepting Bitcoin as a form of payment. So if you take Bitcoin and are not listed here please post and I will add you. We want to hear your story.
CoinMap.org shows organisations on OpenStreetMap who accept Bitcoin. Its a wiki map so if you're organisation is not shown hear you can add yourself for free.
A list of wallet and payment methods can be found here if you want to set up your organisation to start taking Bitcoin. Selection Criteria:
MetaLair have also created some leaflets to help promote Bitcoin to organisations. These are currently available for global%2026.03.14.pdf), UK%2026.03.14.pdf) and Brighton%2026.03.14.pdf) organisations. They are provided as free to use; so please print these and start canvassing organisations near you!
This is list is maintained concurrently with its original on BitcoinTalk.org.
Please be aware some websites may contain malware that could steal your cryptocurrency. No assertion is given for the authenticity of the organisations listed here or quality of the goods and services they provide. Myself and reddit.com cannot be held responsible for the contents of other websites.
If you like what I'm doing or have benefited from my efforts please consider donating to MetaLair, they need your support.
submitted by No_2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: reactjs top posts from 2015-02-03 to 2018-08-04 21:58 PDT

Period: 1277.95 days
Submissions Comments
Total 998 15968
Rate (per day) 0.78 12.50
Unique Redditors 626 4698
Combined Score 75379 55361

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1244 points, 13 submissions: gaearon
    1. New React Docs (175 points, 18 comments)
    2. What's New in Create React App - React Blog (170 points, 33 comments)
    3. Create Apps with No Configuration | React (159 points, 34 comments)
    4. Our First 50,000 Stars (120 points, 8 comments)
    5. React Blog: Mixins Considered Harmful (112 points, 24 comments)
    6. React 15.4.0 - React Blog (86 points, 21 comments)
    7. You Might Not Need Redux (74 points, 20 comments)
    8. React Makes You Sad? (72 points, 37 comments)
    9. React: Design Principles (72 points, 2 comments)
    10. Immutable App Architecture (65 points, 3 comments)
  2. 1243 points, 16 submissions: magenta_placenta
    1. An Example Senior React/Redux Developer Task - You should take no more than 1h30m to complete this task (129 points, 128 comments)
    2. Pose - a declarative animation library for HTML, SVG and React (129 points, 12 comments)
    3. React in patterns - A book about common design patterns used while developing with React. It includes techniques for composition, data flow, dependency management and more (109 points, 6 comments)
    4. WalmartLabs open sources Electrode, a React-based application platform that powers Walmart.com (104 points, 38 comments)
    5. Airbnb’s new open source library lets you design with React and render to Sketch (103 points, 7 comments)
    6. react-dragtastic - a simple drag and drop library for React which uses the more stable mouseDown/mouseUp event pattern instead of the problematic HTML5 drag and drop API (95 points, 14 comments)
    7. Introducing Create React Native App (84 points, 23 comments)
    8. React Express - all-in-one guide for beginners to get an opinionated walkthrough from start to finish: create-react-app, npm, webpack, babel, ES2015, ES2016, JSX, React, Redux, CSS-in-JS, and more (75 points, 4 comments)
    9. React-Flippy allows you to create flipping cards in React projects. It can be used as controlled or uncontrolled component (64 points, 2 comments)
    10. React DOM Confetti - a react component to trigger confetti explosions on state changes (61 points, 8 comments)
  3. 1074 points, 17 submissions: acemarke
    1. React Release Roadmap: 15.5, 16.0, Fiber, deprecations, and build improvements (145 points, 5 comments)
    2. A Community "Thank You" to the Facebook Open Source team (106 points, 1 comment)
    3. React-Redux 5.0.0 final released! (92 points, 23 comments)
    4. The new official React docs site, built with Gatsby (83 points, 10 comments)
    5. React v15.5.0 - React Blog (72 points, 31 comments)
    6. Idiomatic Redux: Using Reselect Selectors for Encapsulation and Performance (62 points, 17 comments)
    7. Redux, Writing, Responsibilities, Burnout, and a Request for Help (61 points, 11 comments)
    8. Redux - Not Dead Yet! (56 points, 55 comments)
    9. Idiomatic Redux: Thoughts on Thunks, Sagas, Abstraction, and Reusability (53 points, 9 comments)
    10. Redux Fundamentals Workshop Slides (51 points, 11 comments)
  4. 871 points, 7 submissions: brianvaughn
    1. React 16.3 has just been published! Enjoy! ⚛ 😁 🎉 (333 points, 18 comments)
    2. Update on Async Rendering (118 points, 23 comments)
    3. You Probably Don't Need Derived State (100 points, 22 comments)
    4. open-source React app for tracking personal diet, sleep, and wellness (96 points, 12 comments)
    5. react-virtualized is looking for maintainers (87 points, 19 comments)
    6. react-window: React components for efficiently rendering large lists and tabular data (83 points, 34 comments)
    7. React 16.3 alpha available on NPM (54 points, 56 comments)
  5. 838 points, 13 submissions: treyhuffine
    1. Learn Redux by Building Redux from Scratch (140 points, 6 comments)
    2. React Component Patterns (108 points, 13 comments)
    3. componentDidMakeSense — React Lifecycle Explanation (87 points, 12 comments)
    4. Cheet sheet for calling setState() (74 points, 13 comments)
    5. Building a GraphQL API with Node and React (58 points, 3 comments)
    6. Introducing ReactScope – Visualize React component hierarchy, state, and props in real time (58 points, 4 comments)
    7. Ethereum & React: Getting Started With The Minimum Toolset Required (53 points, 4 comments)
    8. Structure your React-Redux project for scalability and maintainability (53 points, 8 comments)
    9. Top Articles of the Week — React, Node, Design Patterns, Redux (49 points, 0 comments)
    10. React and Redux with TypeScript (42 points, 15 comments)
  6. 794 points, 8 submissions: swyx
    1. React Typescript Cheatsheet: for react users using Typescript with React for the first time (219 points, 28 comments)
    2. React is 25% of jobs on Hacker News (219 points, 104 comments)
    3. React's absurd growth rate (90 points, 78 comments)
    4. (Liveblog) my entire process of making a PR into React (66 points, 3 comments)
    5. Who's hiring? (58 points, 65 comments)
    6. Why did we build React? - React Blog (2013) (56 points, 7 comments)
    7. Beginner's Thread / Easy Question (July 2018) (52 points, 467 comments)
    8. Sneak peek at the DevTools Profiler with "interactions" - from brianvaughn (34 points, 1 comment)
  7. 712 points, 4 submissions: deadcoder0904
    1. Material-UI v1 is out 🎉 (334 points, 34 comments)
    2. Heres how React's New Context API Works by Wes Bos (235 points, 31 comments)
    3. Your VSCode Setup for making you More productive ? (90 points, 33 comments)
    4. Spectrum goes Open Source 🎉 (53 points, 4 comments)
  8. 688 points, 9 submissions: r-wabbit
    1. Gatsby, the Open Source React-Based Static Site Generator, Gets Commercial Backing (139 points, 29 comments)
    2. How to use React’s new Context API to easily manage modals (127 points, 16 comments)
    3. Debugging a Create React App with VS Code (99 points, 2 comments)
    4. Developing Games with React, Redux, and SVG - Part 2 (84 points, 0 comments)
    5. How to use React’s experimental new Profiler feature (60 points, 1 comment)
    6. Fullstack React: 30 Days of React (50 points, 6 comments)
    7. Performance-tuning a React application. (45 points, 1 comment)
    8. Testing React components (43 points, 0 comments)
    9. Testing React Applications with Jest (41 points, 7 comments)
  9. 685 points, 2 submissions: cpnkl
    1. Give a man a program, frustrate him for a day.Teach a man to program, frustrate him for a lifetime. (357 points, 21 comments)
    2. “Any fool can write code that a computer can understand. Good programmers write code that humans can understand.” — Martin Fowler (328 points, 27 comments)
  10. 639 points, 7 submissions: tyler-mcginnis
    1. Free, live React Native bootcamp. (133 points, 11 comments)
    2. Progression, Curiosity, and Burnout with Dan Abramov (113 points, 0 comments)
    3. Introducing the free, live, React Bootcamp (107 points, 4 comments)
    4. React Fundamentals Course: Learn React (v15.5) for Free (104 points, 21 comments)
    5. Protected routes and authentication with React Router (96 points, 9 comments)
    6. React Router V4 Beta Released (46 points, 16 comments)
    7. React Router v4: Philosophy and Introduction (40 points, 10 comments)
  11. 607 points, 1 submission: alfredmuffin
    1. This killed me (also happy friday!) (607 points, 132 comments)
  12. 603 points, 1 submission: carlosdanna
    1. React Developer Map by adam-golab (603 points, 110 comments)
  13. 576 points, 1 submission: Tayk5
    1. This YouTuber (Ben Awad) has been posting videos on React, PostreSQL, GraphQL, Apollo and more for about 3 years. His recent series on React and GraphQL was 73 videos long a day well over 15 hours of material. His channel deserves more views guys (576 points, 35 comments)
  14. 572 points, 5 submissions: thickoat
    1. ✨ Immensely upgrade your development environment with these Visual Studio Code extensions (174 points, 42 comments)
    2. I created a small but challenging list of fun apps to build (147 points, 5 comments)
    3. Know some React and want to explore the React Native + Redux world? I wrote the perfect guide on how to get started with RN + Redux while building a useful crypto-currency app. (136 points, 5 comments)
    4. Next Level Webpack Dashboard (62 points, 4 comments)
    5. Learn How To Build: Astronomy Picture Of The Day App with NASA API and React + Redux Part II (53 points, 0 comments)
  15. 561 points, 8 submissions: mweststrate
    1. MobX 4 has been released! Better, simpler, faster, smaller (139 points, 16 comments)
    2. MobX 5 has been released! (proxy based) (74 points, 44 comments)
    3. Free Egghead.io course: Manage application state with Mobx-State-Tree (68 points, 7 comments)
    4. Introducing Mobx State Tree, a mutable immutable state tree (67 points, 12 comments)
    5. MobX 3 released: Unpeeling the onion (59 points, 3 comments)
    6. Free egghead.io course: Learn MobX + React in 30 minutes (56 points, 24 comments)
    7. MobX 2.2 has been released: explicit actions, controlled mutations and improved DX (52 points, 14 comments)
    8. Why we chose MobX over Redux for Spectacle Editor (46 points, 1 comment)
  16. 501 points, 8 submissions: dobkin-1970
    1. Building a Progressive Web App in React (99 points, 15 comments)
    2. Node Security: The Most Common XSS Vulnerability in React.js Applications (98 points, 4 comments)
    3. What’s New With Server-Side Rendering in React 16 (63 points, 2 comments)
    4. Introducing React-Static — A progressive static-site framework for React! (61 points, 6 comments)
    5. Announcing Storybook 3.0 (55 points, 1 comment)
    6. How Redux can make you a better developer (52 points, 13 comments)
    7. Microsoft: TypeScript React Starter (37 points, 6 comments)
    8. TypeScript 2.6: JSX Fragment Syntax (36 points, 11 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. acemarke (1237 points, 237 comments)
  2. gaearon (1121 points, 135 comments)
  3. swyx (717 points, 261 comments)
  4. brianvaughn (564 points, 128 comments)
  5. BTMPL (477 points, 104 comments)
  6. drcmda (297 points, 93 comments)
  7. joshmanders (219 points, 28 comments)
  8. phoenixmatrix (214 points, 35 comments)
  9. Capaj (205 points, 79 comments)
  10. vinnl (204 points, 59 comments)
  11. realbriank (199 points, 45 comments)
  12. flapsflapsflaps (185 points, 56 comments)
  13. enkideridu (179 points, 29 comments)
  14. thekenwheeler (178 points, 14 comments)
  15. yyx990803 (177 points, 15 comments)
  16. ClutchHunter (171 points, 57 comments)
  17. editor_of_the_beast (169 points, 38 comments)
  18. turkish_gold (163 points, 58 comments)
  19. NoInkling (161 points, 42 comments)
  20. diegohaz (160 points, 45 comments)
  21. BenjiSponge (155 points, 39 comments)
  22. helpinghat (155 points, 32 comments)
  23. DerNalia (151 points, 78 comments)
  24. pomlife (144 points, 37 comments)
  25. pgrizzay (138 points, 35 comments)
  26. Existential_Owl (138 points, 17 comments)
  27. scotty_pimmpen (135 points, 28 comments)
  28. joesb (130 points, 45 comments)
  29. Apterygiformes (126 points, 14 comments)
  30. slowaccident (126 points, 6 comments)
  31. arendjr (125 points, 32 comments)
  32. zpao (124 points, 8 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. This killed me (also happy friday!) by alfredmuffin (607 points, 132 comments)
  2. React Developer Map by adam-golab by carlosdanna (603 points, 110 comments)
  3. This YouTuber (Ben Awad) has been posting videos on React, PostreSQL, GraphQL, Apollo and more for about 3 years. His recent series on React and GraphQL was 73 videos long a day well over 15 hours of material. His channel deserves more views guys by Tayk5 (576 points, 35 comments)
  4. The subtle but hilarious humour used in the official React tutorial by kyenzie (464 points, 26 comments)
  5. I've made a react.js cheatsheet that includes everything you should know in one single file by LeCoupa (455 points, 44 comments)
  6. Facebook relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable under MIT, starting with React 16 by Vpr99 (454 points, 60 comments)
  7. Pinterest open sourced its full React component UI library by aaronkim234 (381 points, 52 comments)
  8. My favourite barista made this for me today by carolynamcneillie (365 points, 25 comments)
  9. Give a man a program, frustrate him for a day.Teach a man to program, frustrate him for a lifetime. by cpnkl (357 points, 21 comments)
  10. Oversimplified Flow of data through react, redux, express, and PostgreSQL by scottj91 (349 points, 40 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 131 points: gaearon's comment in Confused! Redux or MobX?
  2. 125 points: deleted's comment in My favourite barista made this for me today
  3. 117 points: spruce-bruce's comment in My struggle to learn React
  4. 111 points: joshmanders's comment in Facebook relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable under MIT, starting with React 16
  5. 104 points: Troebr's comment in How long did it take for you to become a senior developer? Is their anything you would have done differently to speed up the process looking back ?
  6. 104 points: jorpjomp's comment in Google's version of react
  7. 101 points: eightfivezero's comment in An Example Senior React/Redux Developer Task - You should take no more than 1h30m to complete this task
  8. 98 points: phoenixmatrix's comment in Why isn't typescript used more in the react community?
  9. 97 points: jb88373's comment in The subtle but hilarious humour used in the official React tutorial
  10. 95 points: Dreadsin's comment in This killed me (also happy friday!)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Blockchain, Miners, and Nodes (Explained Simply) How to run a Full Node ~ Bitcoin to the Max My Casa Bitcoin Lightning Node ⚡⚡ (Review) How To Set Up A Bitcoin Node with Bitseed BTCIOT Tutorial - LED Matrix bitcoin price checker

Use this tool to check if your Bitcoin client is currently accepting incoming connections from other nodes. Port must be between 1024 and 65535. Start a Bitcoin full node on your Linux, Mac, BSD or Windows system to help validate and relay transactions across the Bitcoin network by running this command: Current Chains. These are the chains we currently have reliable nodes running for and can check with 100% certainty. Bitcoin(BTC) Bitcoin Cash(BCH) The purpose of the script is to check the balance of one or multiple bitcoin addresses on three different blockchains: Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash and OMNI. Both total deposits as well as available balance are displayed. The script is completely written in javascript and anyone can review its source code. This website does not store any data. * @file claim_checker.js * Check the balance of your Bitcoin HD wallet at the specified block height. * This is usefull for checking what address is capable of receiving Stellar giveaway coins. One easy way to check if your node is active and running and reachable by nodes is to head over to bitnodes and use the IP address of the machine running bitcoin core (or if you are on a home network, you'll need to find out your public IP address, which can be found by visiting What is My IP) and enter it into the "Join the Network" tool.Remember that your node will only accept incoming ...

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Bitcoin Blockchain, Miners, and Nodes (Explained Simply)

Bitcoin full node by Nodl.it. What you get in the box explained. See what a Bitcoin node looks like and why it's not a miner. From the leaders and imo better than Casa or other full node options ... Today I take a look at the very simple process of setting up a plug in and go Bitcoin node from Bitseed! Tip address: 1NyBoANcFSXc9AeFQtVCa3xEhq51i4qpmi www.bitseed.org. Casa Articles: https://blog.keys.casa/announcing-sats-app-with-satsback/ https://blog.keys.casa/node-tutorial-running-your-casa-node-on-tor/ Check Out My Web... BTCIOT Tutorial - LED Matrix bitcoin price checker - Duration: 16:13. World Crypto Network 784 views. 16:13. Build a Physical Bitcoin Ticker with the ESP8266 - Duration: 10:48. Talking about Sovereignty https://bitcoin.org/en/download https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node#what-is-a-full-node https://blockchain.info/charts/blocks-size htt...

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